As Managing Director of Aged Care Management Australia (ACMA), Peter has guided the growth of the business from it's inception in 2006. Now as one of the sectors leading independent advisory services, ACMA continues to grow.  We have recently moved into a new head office , sharing with our financial partners Henson Lloyd in Adelaide. We maintain a strong commitment to WA with our National Operations Manager, Quality and IT services based in Fremantle. We have introduced a new education and training portfolio that is already proving very popular with clients. Our clinical and advisory programs have been geared to meet the challenges of the new era in aged care. Principal Consultant Peter Vincent acts as independent advisor to National Seniors Chief Advocate, Centre Alliance Senators and aged care providers nationally and is an active advisor with the Commonwealth Government’s national Rural and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Service Development Panel (SDAP). Peter has extensive experience working with Indigenous health and aged care services in remote and very remote regions in both residential and community services.
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Managing staffing levels proactively, not re-actively

Poorly managed work forces- ‘The insidious death of your work place culture’

There has been much debate about the need for standardized staffing levels across the industry. Calls for minimum numbers of care staff, minimum skill sets, based on resident numbers. Generally it is accepted that staffing levels are too low in the current environment and pressures are applied to government to fix the problem. But I can see a far greater problem emerging, and more and more frequently we see the reactive and rapid shedding of staff hours in response to what is generally a short term anomaly in resident numbers or cash flow to pay wages.

Aged care is about providing care and support to increasingly dependent residents. This is our core business. So why is it that when a provider is faced with reduced occupancy that translates into reduced income and cash flow, that the first response is to reduce the numbers of hours available to provide care and services or our core business. Is it that suddenly the other residents know longer need support either?

Having managed many aged care facilities over time in many different environments I understand the need to balance the budget, and i have reduced staffing hours ( and increased them as well) as conditions change. But I have always taken a proactive and balanced approach to managing the changes.

I recognize that every time we cut hours we are destabilizing the work and service environment. We are impacting on the carefully planned routines of our residents, and impacting on the lives of our staff. Building partnerships with staff is a critical factor in developing and maintaining work place culture. Yet some providers have little regard or understanding of the long term effects of constantly playing with staff rosters or shift patterns.

The first impact is that staff become devalued, and will stop respecting and valuing the employer. Sick leave , absenteeism increases and staff turnover all increase.

The second impact is that residents are no longer provided with consistent and planned services. This leads to mistrust and worry within the residents and families groups. Residents can see the changes in staffing, they can see that the meals a delivered later and the dining experience is poor. They hear the staff complaining!

The third impact is loss of control at an organizational level. Organizations that start to make poorly thought through, rapid response changes to service delivery hours, ultimately end in a spiral of uncontrolled cultural change. So rather than saving money, costs increase in other areas such as agency use, recruitment and reputational costs

So what are the opportunities to prevent the death of your culture. Firstly the “do nothing” opportunity should always be the first choice. If you have a down turn in occupancy, don’t just look at the vacancy, examine the changes in dependency of the remaining resident population and consider their needs. Do a financial plan for the next month and understand the risk ( if there is one), and manage the problem.

Secondly if there is there is a need to reduce hours, look at all operational services, not just care staff, after all this is our core business. There are other opportunities that will not impact on resident care, that can still reduce labor costs. I rarely see reductions in finance or HR, or administration, it is always care and hotel services that suffer. Care staff see this as well, and it does build high levels of resentment very quickly toward management.

Thirdly do not change work flow patterns, resident routines , or shift patterns that will impact on the more critical capacity to maintain complex care needs such as medication administration, wound care, or palliative care. Do not introduce short term staggered start or finish times, this leads to a breakdown in communication between staff, poor understanding of daily operational needs and can lead to utter chaos.

Finally, consult and discuss with staff, residents and families, do not dictate or make decisions in the absence of consultation. Your staff will often provide you with solutions that minimize the impact of reductions and if consulted and have an understanding of the broader issues are far more likely to support management, and develop trust, rahter than build resentment

Peter Vincent is Managing Director of Aged Care Management Australia and is an industry expert

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Aged Care Compliance Data 1st July 2019 to 21st January 2020

At Aged Care Management Australia (ACMA) we continue to track and analyse the most frequently failed outcomes. This helps us inform our clients on ways to develop stronger systems and documentation through risk assessment processes, education and mentoring staff. The following images capture the most frequently failed outcomes during the period of 1 July 2019 through to 21 January 2020, where we explore:

  • Number of providers issued with Non Compliance, by State
  • Non Compliance to the Aged Care Quality Standards Criteria
  • Number of providers issued with Sanctions, by State
  • Sanctions to the Aged Care Quality Standards Criteria

For further details on how we can support your organisation please contact us directly at info@acmaa.com.au.

Total number of providers, by State, issued with Non-Compliance notice.
1 July 2019 – 21 January 2020
Total number of Non-Compliance issued for each of the Aged Care Quality Standards Criteria.
1 July 2019 – 21 January 2020
Total number of providers, by State, issued with a Sanction notice.
1 July 2019 – 21 January 2020
Total number of Sanction issued for each of the Aged Care Quality Standards Criteria.
1 July 2019 – 21 January 2020
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Aged Care Compliance Data July 1st to 30th November 2019

Last week we posted that according to the Quality and Safety Commission’s data more than 25 percent of services who enter into TFI’s fail to recover them. Now we provide the data showing the most frequently failed outcomes

Aged Care Management Australia (ACMA) continue to track and analyse the most frequently failed outcomes. This helps us inform our clients on ways of developing stronger systems and documentation through risk assessment processes, education and mentoring staff. The following are the most frequently failed outcomes since July 1st through until 30th November. For further details on how we can support your organization please contact us directly at peter@acmaa.com.au or fiona@acmaa.com.au

Top 5 Non-Compliance by criteria:

3.a Each consumer gets safe and effective personal care, clinical care, or both personal care and clinical care, that: (i) Is best practice; and (ii) tailored to their needs; and (iii) optimises their health and well-being.

3.b Effective management of high impact or high-prevalence risks associated with the care of each consumer.

7.a The workforce is planned to enable, and the number and mix of members of the workforce deployed enables, the delivery and management of safe and quality care and services.

8.c Effective organisation wide governance systems relating to the following: (i) information management (ii) continuous improvement (iii) financial governance (iv) workforce governance, including the assignment of clear responsibilities and accountabilities (v) regulatory compliance (vi) feedback and complaints.

8.e Where clinical care is provided – a clinical governance framework, including but not limited to the following: (i) antimicrobial stewardship (ii) minimising the use of restraint (iii) open disclosure is in place.

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‘Shameless’ One Nation blocks financial transparency of aged care providers

Pauline Hanson and the Government have blocked a game-changing amendment that would have forced aged care providers to reveal how much they actually spend on food, staff, and other costs of delivering care. Centre Alliance Senator Stirling Griff moved an amendment to the Aged Care Legislation Amendment (New Commissioner Functions) Bill 2019 that would have required residential aged care providers to give annual financial statements to the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commissioner, who would then make them public. The amendment had the support of Labor and Jackie Lambie but was blocked (vote 34:34) when One Nation sided with the Government to oppose it. The amendment would have required providers to disclose their income, their spend on food and medication, the amount spent on staff and staff training, accommodation, administration, and how much they pay out to their parent bodies. This would have enabled stakeholders to have a clear view – for the first time – on the proportion of income that providers actually spend on costs of care and how much is just being pocketed or wasted. “One Nation is shameless. It claims to stand up for ordinary people but apparently this doesn’t extend to vulnerable elderly in residential aged care who are suffering neglect and abuse,” Senator Griff says. “This was a simple amendment that did a simple but very crucial thing. It was a potential game changer.  “Providers might object to the administrative ‘burden’ of having to provide annual financial statements but, frankly, that is a paltry concern when weighed against the vast public benefits this transparency would have finally provided.” For interview or further information: Senator Griff on 0413 999 100 
ATSI

Aged Care Sector Support Services

As pressure to maintain compliance grows within the sector, ‘Aged Care Management Australia Pty Ltd’ are your trusted Independent advisors with a ‘100 percent’ success rate.

Aged Care Management Australia (ACMA) are one of the most experienced independent aged care advisory services. Specializing in the prevention of non-compliance and sanctions, clinical and operational governance, contract facility management, training and education.

Our experienced team of Nurse Advisors, Clinical Nurse Consultants and Educators bring a practical, hands-on approach and specialized skills.  We partner with your staff to provide effective support where it makes a difference. 

Our benefits include

  • Truly independent
  • Transparent fee structure
  • Guaranteed to be on site (anywhere nationally) within 48 hours
  • Highly motivated and experienced clinical team to support your staff
  • Clearly defined and measurable deliverables
  • Governance support provided by industry experienced executives

The ACMA difference

  • 100% of providers believe ACMA is good value for money
  • 100% of providers are highly likely to recommend ACMA to colleagues and other service providers in the industry
  • 100% of providers strongly agree that ACMA understand the needs of their business
  • 100% of providers are very satisfied with the advice given to their Board, CEO and Executive

For further information please contact us directly at peter@acmaa.com.au

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Aged Care Management Australia Pty Ltd Your trusted partner

Aged Care Management Australia Pty Ltd (ACMA) is a family owned business that has been operating in the aged care sector nationally for 17 years. We continue to grow our business based on developing trusted relationships with our clients.
As advisors, we have worked with more than 60 Board and Executive teams to strengthen governance systems and address key operational risks, including non-compliance / sanction, financial viability and infrastructure requirements.
ACMA is aware of the challenges faced by executive teams and boards. Understanding workplace culture, community expectations, geographical location, increasing resident acuity and changing demands on infrastructure within the context of significant Aged Care sector reforms are common issues.
Since the introduction of the new Aged Care Quality Standards 01 July 2019, ACMA has been engaged by Service Providers and the Aged Care Industry Association South Australia to translate new policy initiatives and directions into practical strategies that respond to both new regulatory requirements and the emerging trends in service delivery models. Our education encompasses staffing models, nursing practice, consumer engagement and practical solutions to ensure safe and quality care delivery.
Our team has significant sector experience and is adept in building constructive relationships with the shared goal of harnessing the strengths and capabilities of all stakeholders to address issues and achieve the best possible outcome. Our operational knowledge and understanding of the key issues is invaluable to overcoming barriers and influencing Boards and Executive views on alternative strategies.
ACMA act as independent advisors to National Seniors Chief Advocate, Centre Alliance Senators and aged care providers nationally and is an active advisor with the Commonwealth Government’s national Rural and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Service Development Panel (SDAP). We have extensive experience working with Indigenous health and aged care services in remote and very remote regions in both residential and community services.
For further information please contact us directly at peter@acmaa.com.au

ATSI

Early Trends Emerge in National Compliance Data

For the past four years, Aged Care Management Australia (ACMA) have been collating and trending compliance outcomes across all residential care services that have been issued notices of non-compliance or sanction.
ACMA’s analysis of compliance data since the introduction of the Aged Care Quality Standards on 01 July show there has been little change in the primary cause of non-compliance and potential sanctions.

The top ten failed requirements to date are;
Standard 1 – Consumer dignity and choice
1a – Each consumer is treated with dignity and respect, with their identity, culture and diversity valued.
Standard 2 – Ongoing assessment and planning with consumers
2e – Care and services are reviewed regularly for effectiveness, and when circumstances change or when incidents impact on the needs, goals or preferences of the consumer.
Standard 3 – Personal care and clinical care
3a – Each consumer gets safe and effective personal care, clinical care, or both personal care and clinical care, that (i) Is best practice; and (ii) tailored to their needs; and (iii) optimises their health and well-being.
3b – Effective management of high-impact or high-prevalence risks associated with the care of each consumer.
3d – Deterioration or change of a consumer’s mental health, cognitive or physical function, capacity or condition is recognised and responded to in a timely manner.
Standard 7 – Human resources
7a – The workforce is planned to enable, and the number and mix of members of the workforce deployed enables, the delivery and management of safe and quality care and services.
7c – The workforce is competent, and members of the workforce have the qualifications and knowledge to effectively perform their roles.
Standard 8 – Organisational governance
8c – Effective organisation wide governance systems relating to the following: (i) information management; (ii) continuous improvement; (iii) financial governance; (iv) workforce governance, including the assignment of clear responsibilities and accountabilities; (v) regulatory compliance; and (vi) feedback and complaints.
8d – Effective risk management systems and practices, including but not limited to the following: (i) managing high-impact or high-prevalence risks associated with the care of consumers; (ii) identifying and responding to abuse and neglect of consumers; and (iii) supporting consumers to live the best life they can.
8e – Where clinical care is provided – a clinical governance framework, including but not limited to the following: (i) antimicrobial stewardship; (ii) minimising the use of restraint; (iii) open disclosure.

We continue to use this data to inform ourselves and our clients of emerging trends across the industry and to establish risk management plans to mitigate the potential for non-compliance.
Our process involves the completion of a detailed Gap Analysis against the Aged Care Quality Standards and providing a detailed report and risk assessment which is presented to boards and management to ensure there is a clear understanding of their exposure and the priorities for improvement.
The Gap Analysis has also been used by providers to inform their self-assessment and plan for continuous improvement.
ACMA has been providing compliance services for over 16 years and have directly assisted over 60 different facilities maintain compliance and or recover from non-compliance in a cost-effective sustainable way. Our team of senior clinicians, educators and aged care advisors’ partner with aged care providers to create sustainable positive change in the workplace.

ATSI

CCTV in residential aged care

Back in April of this year ACMA hosted an open forum to discuss the issues surrounding the use of CCTV in residents rooms. Over the past few months, there has been more and more evidence of residents being injured / killed , in resident to resident incidents where there is often no visual record of the event. Resident to resident incidents are by far the most common issue that we have to manage. So it is timely that I re host this video of the open forum and stimulate more discussion. ACMA is hosting another forum in Perth in September to discuss the issues, ethics, rights and responsibilities with residents, providers and staff.

https://www.acmaa.com.au/pub/responsibilities.mp4

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Aged Care Management Australia remains the preferred provider for new Approved Providers

ACMA continues to receive frequent requests for individuals and groups wishing to be come approved providers. There has been a surge in interest in gaining approval particularly in the Home Care sector. ACMA managing director Peter Vincent explains “we ( ACMA) have received calls from individuals and groups who want to become providers. Often we have requests for support following failed applications. ACMA has developed a one day workshop where we work with the potential client to develop an understanding of the clients planned business model, financial and operational capacity before proceeding to write the application. We have found that this is an effective way of ensuring our client fully understands their responsibilities under the Act and that they have the required capacity. ACMA have a 100% success rate with clients achieving Approved Provider status when they have completed our workshop. For further details contact Fiona Duncan at fiona@acmaa.com.au

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Aged Care Management Australia maintains 100% success rate in the management of Non-Compliance and Sanctions

Since August 2017 Aged Care Management Australia ( ACMA) has been engaged continuously in the management of sanctions and non-compliance ( to prevent sanctions) . Appointment as advisors and administrators on the Central Coast NSW, the ACT, Regional and metropolitan South Australia and Perth have all resulted in either the prevention of sanctions being applied or in the resolution of sanctions within the sanction period. These contracts involved a combination of residential and home care operations.

This follows on from our earlier work in the management of sanctions which started in 2010 in Wollongong NSW. ACMA was the first advisory service appointed to the management of sanctions in remote Indigenous Home Care programs in the Northern Territory.

Since the introduction of the new Aged Care Quality Standards 01 July 2019, ACMA has been engaged by Service Providers and the Aged Care Industry Association South Australia to translate new policy initiatives and directions into practical strategies that respond to both new regulatory requirements and the emerging trends in service delivery models. Our education encompasses staffing models, nursing practice, consumer engagement and practical solutions to ensure safe and quality care delivery.

Our team has significant sector experience and is adept in building constructive relationships with the shared goal of harnessing the strengths and capabilities of all stakeholders to address issues and achieve the best possible outcome.  Our operational knowledge and understanding of the key issues is invaluable to overcoming barriers and influencing Boards and Executive views on alternative strategies.